dynastylnoire

yagazieemezi:

Vlisco ‘Celebrate’

'The season of glamour and giving is here. It’s time to dress up, gather with your loved ones, exchange gifts – and celebrate! Treat yourself to a sophisticated festive look by wearing Vlisco, the only true original, this season and show that you care by buying your friends and family the only authentic Dutch Wax.

This season we pay tribute to the art of the drawing, and to our textile designers, without whom none of our patterns would be possible. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Sanne van Winden, textile designer at Vlisco, for her stunning hand-drawn illustrations, which have added imagination to our campaign photography.’

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

karnythia

dynastylnoire:

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale

As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

OMG THIS IS AWESOME!

mrforde

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

Leo and Diane Dillon

Various Illustrations

Leo and Diane Dillon were one of the greatest illustration teams in the history of Fantasy Art. Books that have used their illustrations for cover or inside art include an edition of the Narnia books, Garth Nix’s Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen, Her Stories and The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin, Aida by Leontyne Price, The Girl Who Dreamed Only Geese by Howard A. Norman, and many, many more.

There is a blog dedicated to archiving their work here.

africaninsights

artphotocollector:

“Can the ubiquitous language of commodity culture and advertising be employed to speak to, and about, more than merchandise and celebrity?  If so, to what end?”Hank Willis Thomas

About an hour northwest of New York City, a small museum, The Aldrich Contemporary, is exhibiting from now until late September, the work of an artist who will make you think. Hank Willis Thomas’s series, “Strange Fruit,” isn’t pulling any punches. The title of a famous Billie Holiday song written to protest southern lynchings and racist violence, “Strange Fruit,” in the 21st Century, has even greater connotations.  

Thomas’s images confront and provoke. They’re beautiful and they’re troublesome.  Their impact, however, will be mitigated by what the viewer brings to the experience.  For the values and ideas we all bear, frame our interpretations. I find these images potent and dark. They’re reminders of the complexities surrounding economics, history, race and class in our visual culture.  But what others see, I can’t say.  And like Hank Willis Thomas, I also ask, “If so, to what end?”  —Lane Nevares