knowledgeequalsblackpower

afro-textured-art:

Elaborate Afro-textured Hairstyles

"The tightly spiraled hair of Africans makes it possible to design and shape it in many ways impossible for the straighter hair of Europeans."

-Thornton, John. Africa and Africans in the making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1680. Cambridge University Press. 1992. p. 230

All related posts will be tagged “Elaborate

mrforde

dynamicafrica:

Five African Films that Highlight Mothers (and Mother Figures).

SARAFINA!

There are not one but two women in this film that are wonderful mother figures. The first, and most prominent in the film, is Whoopi Goldberg’s character. An inspiring woman from the moment we meet her, Mary Masombuka is not only a teacher, but a woman who’s vision of black liberation in apartheid South Africa propels her to defy racist and brutal authorities. Where Masombuka lacks the vigor of youth, Sarafina fills in and fulfills the dreams that cannot be contained to the four walls of their classroom. But let’s not forget Sarafina’s real mother played by the unforgettable Miriam Makeba. Although in this part of the film we see Sarafina almost mocking her mother’s complacency as a domestic worker, we know that Sarafina sees beyond their circumstances to understand the sacrificial nature of this relationship.

YESTERDAY

Dedicated wife, mother and friend, Yesterday (played by Leleti Khumalo) is a hard-working young woman living in the Zululand village of Rooihook whose life takes a sudden turn for the worst when she discovers that she’s infected with HIV/AIDS. As she confronts her husband, a migrant labourer working in the mines, his violent reaction and rejection of her and her young daughter, Beauty, shocks Yesterday but also makes her more dedicated to ensure that Beauty receives an education and is taken care of when Yesterday is no longer around.

MADAME BROUETTE

A single mother who divorced her abusive husband, Mati (Rokhaya Niang) toils daily by selling various goods at a nearby market, which she transports there via a large wheelbarrow — prompting local residents to dub her “Madame Brouette.”

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST

Perhaps one of the most cinematically beautiful films ever made, this diaspora film by directer Julie Dash is full of women of various generations who are more than inspiring in their own right.

FARAW, MOTHER OF THE DUNES

Dedicated to the mother of the film director, Faraw tells the story of Zamiatou - a woman who more than fulfills her role as a dutiful wife and mother for her Sahelian family. It’s a difficult and burdensome life for her and, tired of seeing her mother suffer, Zamiatou’s daughter Hareyrata offers to work as a maid for rich French tourists, but her mother refuses. However, it’s not long before Zamiatou has to find a job of her own to support her family.

wifigirl2080

wifigirl2080:

clstt:

lecinematheque:

Les Saignantes (2005) - dir. Jean-Pierre Bekolo // Cameroon & France

A futuristic film set in a dystopian Cameroonian city, Les Saignantes is shot in high contrast lighting during one long continuous night in which two women, Cuy and Chouchou who are equal parts witches, sex workers and political activists, must navigate the city as the attempt to get rid of the body of one of their clients.

femburton
I think I might have found the movie for you

!!!!

mrforde

dynamicafrica:

Five African Films that Highlight Mothers (and Mother Figures).

SARAFINA!

There are not one but two women in this film that are wonderful mother figures. The first, and most prominent in the film, is Whoopi Goldberg’s character. An inspiring woman from the moment we meet her, Mary Masombuka is not only a teacher, but a woman who’s vision of black liberation in apartheid South Africa propels her to defy racist and brutal authorities. Where Masombuka lacks the vigor of youth, Sarafina fills in and fulfills the dreams that cannot be contained to the four walls of their classroom. But let’s not forget Sarafina’s real mother played by the unforgettable Miriam Makeba. Although in this part of the film we see Sarafina almost mocking her mother’s complacency as a domestic worker, we know that Sarafina sees beyond their circumstances to understand the sacrificial nature of this relationship.

YESTERDAY

Dedicated wife, mother and friend, Yesterday (played by Leleti Khumalo) is a hard-working young woman living in the Zululand village of Rooihook whose life takes a sudden turn for the worst when she discovers that she’s infected with HIV/AIDS. As she confronts her husband, a migrant labourer working in the mines, his violent reaction and rejection of her and her young daughter, Beauty, shocks Yesterday but also makes her more dedicated to ensure that Beauty receives an education and is taken care of when Yesterday is no longer around.

MADAME BROUETTE

A single mother who divorced her abusive husband, Mati (Rokhaya Niang) toils daily by selling various goods at a nearby market, which she transports there via a large wheelbarrow — prompting local residents to dub her “Madame Brouette.”

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST

Perhaps one of the most cinematically beautiful films ever made, this diaspora film by directer Julie Dash is full of women of various generations who are more than inspiring in their own right.

FARAW, MOTHER OF THE DUNES

Dedicated to the mother of the film director, Faraw tells the story of Zamiatou - a woman who more than fulfills her role as a dutiful wife and mother for her Sahelian family. It’s a difficult and burdensome life for her and, tired of seeing her mother suffer, Zamiatou’s daughter Hareyrata offers to work as a maid for rich French tourists, but her mother refuses. However, it’s not long before Zamiatou has to find a job of her own to support her family.

mrforde

africaisdonesuffering:

Artist Lounge: “When Art Gets Political”

Meet Kenyan artist Michael Soi, who is considered to be a part of the next generation of prominent Kenyan artists. Soi started his career as a sculptor and later evolved into a unique and ecclectic visual artist. A majority of his work touches on socio-political concerns. Soi’s art addresses issues of political freedom, self-indulgence and Kenya’s growing sex industry through his own comical interpretation.

There has been much discussion as well as different opinions in regards to China’s involvement in Africa. China is now Africa’s major trade partner and in some cases has been viewed as an exploiter of Africa’s raw materials. “China Loves Africa” was Michael Soi’s 18-piece series that not only captured China’s associations with Africa but also highlighted the manipulative ways that he saw China acting as Africa’s neo-colonist.

“African leaders are seeking trade partners who will not ask questions; so in essence, China is Africa’s sugar daddy. ” - Michael Soi

knowledgeequalsblackpower

yagazieemezi:

I’ve been enjoying the images Zina Sara-Wiwa has been putting up on her personal Instagram!

Zina Saro-Wiwa is a video artist and film-maker. She makes video installations, documentaries, photographs and experimental films. She currently lives and works in the Niger Delta where she is making new work for two museum shows and where she has set up her own pop-up, artist-run art gallery called Boys Quarters Project Space, in the city of Port Harcourt.

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic